THE TOWN OF BELVIDERE, VERMONT (05442)
DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

  • Chartered: November 4, 1791 (Vermont Charter)
  • Area: 20,521 Acres = 32.06 Square Miles [Size Rank: 191*]
  • Coordinates (Geographic Center): N 44° 45′ W 72°41′
  • Altitude: 720 feet ASL
  • Population (US Census, 2010): 345 [Population Rank: 230*]
  • Population Density (persons per square mile): 9.2 [Density Rank: 230*]
  • Government: Select Board & Town Meeting
  • Public Schools: Lamoille North Supervisory Union & Belvidere Central School

*Area, Population and Density rankings refer to Belvidere’s relative position among Vermont’s 255 civic entities (9 cities, 242 towns, 4 gores and grants).

ABOUT BELVIDERE, VERMONT – Estimated 2010 Population is – 298:
Belvidere is located in the northeastern section of Lamoille County. It is bordered by Johnson on the south, Eden on the east and Waterville on the west. The town has a planning commission and has a town plan. It has no zoning or subdivision regulations. Two state highways run through the Town of Belvidere. VT Route 109 bisects the town and serves as the major route connecting Belvidere to Eden and Route 100 to the northeast and Waterville to the west. VT Route 118 is a smaller road, but still a significant east/west roadway carrying traffic and goods across the town. The main village center is located on Route 109.

OF HISTORIC INTEREST:
One of several Vermont parcels granted to New York City lawyer John Kelly, spelled Belvedere in the grant. Kelly was a land speculator on a grand scale, but more popular than many of his New York counterparts. After the Revolution, he worked closely with William Johnson (for whom the neighboring town of Johnson is named) in the effort to get Vermont admitted to the Union.

Kelly, being quite Irish, is believed to have named this town for Lake Belvedere, one of the most beautiful bodies of water in Ireland. The word itself is a translation from Italian for “beautiful view”; in Kelly’s time, as now, the word was also a common noun for a small or open summer house from which to enjoy the scenery.

Material excerpted or adapted from Esther Munroe Swift’s~Vermont Place-Names: Footprints of History